Please Note: This website has been archived and is no longer maintained.
See the Open Networking Foundation for current OpenFlow-related information.

Create OpenFlow network with

multiple PCs/NetFPGAs

Setup OpenFlow network controlled by NOX with a set of PCs in the Lab in half day.

  • 4. Controller Setup
  • 5. Basic Test
  •  

    1. Description of an Example Setup

    In this page, we’ll create an OpenFlow network with three OpenFlow switches controlled by NOX 0.6 controller. Among three OpenFlow switches, two are PC based software OpenFlow switches and one is NetFPGA based hardware OpenFlow switch. If you don’t have NetFPGA board, then just use a PC instead. Lab Setup

    Configuration Summary

    OpenFlow Switches

    Switch IP address to talk to the controller Controller Ethernet Port OpenFlow Ethernet Ports
    Switch1 (PC1) 192.168.0.1/255.255.255.0 eth0 eth1, eth2
    Switch2 (PC2 with NetFPGA board) 192.168.0.2/255.255.255.0 eth0 nf2c0, nf2c1, nf2c2, nf2c3
    Switch3 (PC3) 192.168.0.3/255.255.255.0 eth0 eth1, eth2

    OpenFlow Controller (NOX 0.6)

    IP address TCP port number
    192.168.0.100/255.255.255.0 6633

    2. Hardware Requirements

    PCs for OpenFlow Switches

    These are PC1, PC2, PC3 shown in the figure. We’ll run OpenFlow software reference design on those PCs. Any PC running Linux 2.6 kernel would work, but there are some dependency on the linux distribution. Please check the release notes in OpenFlow reference design. Depending on the network topology you would like to create, you need to install NICs (network interface cards) on those PCs. Note that NetFPGA only work with 1Gb/s ethernet (not 100Mbps or 10Mbps), so the interface connecting to the NetFPGA interface has to be gigabit ethernet NIC. In the configuration shown in the figure, you need three ethernet ports on each PC.

    PC for OpenFlow Switch with NetFPGA card

    Go User Guide page in the NetFPGA website (http://netfpga.org/foswiki/bin/view/NetFPGA/OneGig/Guide) to see the requirement of the PC and how to get NetFPGA card. Pre-built system is also available.

    PC for OpenFlow Controller

    This is for PC4 shown in the figure. Currently we have three different types of OpenFlow controllers, NOX, SNAC and Reference Controller. In this page, we use SNAC 0.6 for the controller. Any Linux PC would work, but we assume it runs Debian Stable (Lenny) in this page.

    3. Setup OpenFlow Switches on PCs/NetFPGAs

    3.1. Setup OpenFlow Switch on PC

    There are two different OpenFlow v1.0 switch implementations available. One is Stanford’s software reference design and the other is OpenVswitch (http://openvswitch.org/) implementation. While the former has user-space implementation, the latter has kernel-space implementation. The forwarding performance is (naturally) better in the kernel space implementation. Adding new features would be easier in the user space implementation. Pick the one depending on your need.

    3.1.1. Stanford Software Reference Design

    Step1. Download Software
     $ git clone git://gitosis.stanford.edu/openflow.git
     $ cd openflow
     $ git checkout -b openflow.v1.0 origin/release/1.0.0
    
    Step2. Compile
     $ ./boot.sh
     $ ./configure
     $ make
    
    Step3. Run OpenFlow Switch

    Here we assume eth1 and eth2 will be included in OpenFlow datapath (as shown in Configuration Summary). We also need to assign datapath-id to this OpenFlow switch. The datapath-id has to be unique among the switches controlled by a single OpenFlow controller. One way to pick an unique datapath id is to use MAC address of one of this PC’s interface. Let’s assume we’ll use datapath-id 0x004E46324304 for this OpenFlow switch.

    # ./udatapath/ofdatapath --detach punix:/var/run/dp0 -d 004E46324304 -i eth1,eth2
    

    Note: ‘–detach’ option make it run in background as daemon. ‘punix:/var/run/dp0′ is specifying an Unix domain socket file through which we can talk to this switch.

    Step4. Let OpenFlow Switch talk to the controller

    Then run OpenFlow protocol module talk to the controller. Here we assume the controller is running on 192.168.0.100 port 6633.

     # ./secchan/ofprotocol unix:/var/run/dp0 tcp:192.168.0.100:6633
    

    Note that the file name ‘/var/run/dp0′ has to be consistent to the UNIX domain socket file name we specified in the previous step.

    3.1.2. OpenVswitch Implementation

    Another choice is OpenVswitch implementation.

    Step1. Download Software

    As of Nov 19, 2010, the latest version is “1.1.0 pre2″ and you can download it from the link, http://openvswitch.org/releases/openvswitch-1.1.0pre2.tar.gz

     $ wget http://openvswitch.org/releases/openvswitch-1.1.0pre2.tar.gz
     $ tar zxvf openvswitch-1.1.0pre2.tar.gz
     $ cd  openvswitch-1.1.0pre2
    
    Step2. Compile
     $ ./boot.sh
     $ ./configure --with-l26=/lib/modules/`uname -r`
     $ make
    
    Step3. Run OpenFlow switch

    Insert OpenFlow kernel module, openvswitch_mod.ko.

     $ su -
     # /sbin/insmod ./datapath/linux-2.6/openvswitch_mod.ko
    

    Create OpenFlow switch datapath.

     # ./utilities/ovs-dpctl adddp dp0
    

    Then, add interface to the datapath. Interfaces names (eth1, eth2) depend on your system.

     # ./utilities/ovs-dpctl addif nl:0 eth1
     # ./utilities/ovs-dpctl addif nl:0 eth2
    
    Step4. Let OpenFlow Switch talk to the controller

    Then let OpenFlow protocol module talk to the controller. Let’s assume we’ll use datapath-id 0x004E46324304 for this OpenFlow switch and the controller is running on 192.168.0.100 port 6633.

    # ./utilities/ovs-openflowd dp0 --datapath-id=0000004E46324304 tcp:192.168.0.100 port 6633 --out-of-band
    

    3.2. Setup OpenFlow Switch on NetFPGA

    Please refer to the following page for the complete instruction: CentOS NetFPGA Install

    Step0. Basic Setup of NetFPGA

    Please refer http://netfpga.org/foswiki/bin/view/NetFPGA/OneGig/Guide to setup NetFPGA.

    Step1. Download Software

     $ git clone git://gitosis.stanford.edu/openflow.git
     $ cd openflow
     $ git checkout -b 1.0.0-netfpga origin/devel/tyabe/1.0.0-netfpga
    

    Step2. Compile

     $ ./boot.sh
     $ cd ./hw-lib/nf2
     $ wget http://gitosis.stanford.edu/downloads/netfpga/openflow_switch.bit.100_3.tar.gz
     $ tar zxvf openflow_switch.bit.100_3.tar.gz
     $ cd ../../
     $ ./configure --enable-hw-tables=nf2
     $ make
    

    Step3. Run

    Program NetFPGA card as OpenFlow switch.

     # /root/NF2/lib/scripts/cpci_reprogram/cpci_reprogram.pl
     # nf_download ./datapath/hwtable_nf2/openflow_switch.bit
    

    Here we assume eth1 and eth2 will be included in OpenFlow datapath (as shown in Configuration Summary). We also need to assign datapath-id to this OpenFlow switch. The datapath-id has to be unique among the switches controlled by a single OpenFlow controller. One way to pick an unique datapath id is to use MAC address of one of this PC’s interface. Let’s assume we’ll use datapath-id 0x004E46324304 for this OpenFlow switch.

    # ./udatapath/ofdatapath --detach punix:/var/run/dp0 -d 004E46324304 -i nf2c0,nf2c1,nf2c2,nf2c3
    

    Note: ‘–detach’ option make it run in background as daemon. ‘punix:/var/run/dp0′ is specifying an Unix domain socket file through which we can talk to this switch.

    Step4. Let OpenFlow Switch talk to the controller

    Then run OpenFlow protocol module talk to the controller. Here we assume the controller is running on 192.168.0.100 port 6633.

    # ./secchan/ofprotocol unix:/var/run/dp0 tcp:192.168.0.100:6633
    

    Note that the file name ‘/var/run/dp0′ has to be consistent to the UNIX domain socket file name we specified in the previous step.

    4. Controller Setup

    We’ll setup NOX 0.6 here. For the complete information, visit NOX website.

    Step0. Install Pre-requisite Packages

    Prerequiste packages depend on the linux distribution on the controller PC. In the case of Debian Stable (Lenny), you have to install the following packages:

    $ apt-get install autoconf automake g++ libtool python python-twisted \
           swig libboost1.35-dev libxerces-c2-dev libssl-dev make        \
           libsqlite3-dev python-simplejson        \
            python-sphinx

    Step1. Download Software

     $ git clone git://noxrepo.org/nox
     $ cd nox
    

    By default, you’ll get OpenFlow v0.8.9 compatible NOX (as of 5/20/2010). If you want to OpenFlow v1.0 compatible NOX, then you need to checkout the corresponding branch. Here is the instruction:

     #### this is only for OpenFlow v1.0 user
       $ git branch -a
          * master
          remotes/origin/HEAD -> origin/master
          remotes/origin/destiny
          remotes/origin/master
          remotes/origin/openflow-0.9
          remotes/origin/openflow-1.0
       $ git checkout -b nox_v06_ofv1.0 remotes/origin/openflow-1.0
       $ git branch -a
            master
          * nox_v06_ofv1.0
             remotes/origin/HEAD -> origin/master
             remotes/origin/destiny
             remotes/origin/master
             remotes/origin/openflow-0.9
             remotes/origin/openflow-1.0
    

    Step2. Compile

    $ ./boot.sh
    $ mkdir build
    $ cd build/
    $ ../configure
    $ make
    

    Step3. Run

    Run NOX with routing module only. Routing module will do the shortest path routing.

    $ cd src
    $ ./nox_core -i ptcp:6633 routing
    

    5. Basic Test

    On the controller PC, first check the switches are connected to the controller. You can check this by

    $ netstat -an | grep 6663

    Assign the IP addresses to Client1 and Client2 (on the same subnet) and run ping to check they can communicate. On each switch, you can run the following command to see the flow table is actually installed.

    For Stanford reference design OpenFlow implementation

    $ cd <your OpenFlow comipled dir>
    $ ./utilities/ovs-dpctl dump-flows unix:/var/run/dp0

    For OpenVswitch OpenFlow implementation

    $ cd <your OpenFlow comipled dir>
    $ ./utilities/ovs-dpctl dump-flows dp0